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  • Arthritis of the Shoulder

    Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Osteoarthritis Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Osteoarthritis

    Osteoarthritis also called degenerative joint disease, is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in older people. AC joint osteoarthritis affects the tissue covering the ends of bones (cartilage) in the AC joint of the shoulder.

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  • Acromioclavicular (AC) Arthritis Acromioclavicular (AC) Arthritis

    The acromioclavicular joint is part of the shoulder joint. It is formed by the union of the acromion, a bony process of the shoulder blade, and the outer end of the collar bone or clavicle.

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  • Shoulder Injuries and Tears

    Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Injuries Acromioclavicular (AC) Joint Injuries

    The acromioclavicular (AC) joint in the shoulder is very important for shoulder strength, motion, and maintaining shoulder position. The joint is stabilized by various ligaments and a capsule, which can cause pain and affect normal joint function if damaged.

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  • Baseball and Shoulder Injuries Baseball and Shoulder Injuries

    Shoulder injuries in baseball players are usually associated with pitching. While this overhand throwing activity can produce great speed and distance for the ball, when performed repeatedly, can place a lot of stress on the shoulder.

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  • Shoulder Ligament Injuries Shoulder Ligament Injuries

    Shoulder ligament injuries are injuries to the tough elastic tissues present around the shoulder that connect bones to each other and stabilize the joint.

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  • Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder Throwing Injuries of the Shoulder

    Throwing injuries of the shoulder are injuries sustained as a result of trauma by athletes during sports activities that involve repetitive overhand motions of the arm as in baseball, American football, volleyball, rugby, tennis, track and field events, etc.

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  • Rotator Cuff Tear Rotator Cuff Tear

    A rotator cuff is a group of tendons in the shoulder joint that provides support and enables a wide range of motion. A major injury to these tendons may result in rotator cuff tears.

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  • SLAP Tears SLAP Tears

    The term SLAP (superior –labrum anterior-posterior) lesion or SLAP tear refers to an injury of the superior labrum of the shoulder.

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  • Partial Rotator Cuff Tear Partial Rotator Cuff Tear

    A partial rotator cuff tear is an incomplete tear that involves damage to a part of the tendon. The tear can be at the top, bottom or inner side of the tendon and does not go all the way through the tendon completely.

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  • Shoulder Labral Tear Shoulder Labral Tear

    Traumatic injury to the shoulder or overuse of the shoulder (throwing, weightlifting) may cause the labrum to tear. In addition, aging may weaken the labrum leading to injury.

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  • Bicep Tendon Rupture Bicep Tendon Rupture

    The biceps muscle is located in the front side of your upper arm and functions to help you bend and rotate your arm.

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  • Proximal Biceps Tendon Rupture Proximal Biceps Tendon Rupture

    The biceps muscle is the muscle of the upper arm which is necessary for the movement of the shoulder and elbow. It is made of a ‘short head’ and a ‘long head’ which function together. These are connected to the shoulder joint by two tendons called the proximal biceps tendons and to the elbow joint by a single distal biceps tendon.

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  • Long Head Biceps Tendon Rupture Long Head Biceps Tendon Rupture

    Your biceps muscle has two heads, a long head, and a short head, which are both attached to the shoulder. The long head of the biceps tendon is a tough band of connective fibrous tissue that attaches the long head of the biceps to the top of the shoulder socket.

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  • Shoulder Fracture

    Clavicle Fracture Clavicle Fracture

    The break or fracture of the clavicle (collarbone) is a common sports injury associated with contact sports such as football and martial arts, as well as impact sports such as motor racing.

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  • Glenoid Fractures Glenoid Fracture

    Fractures of the glenoid are rare but can occur due to major trauma or during high-energy sports activities.

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  • Periprosthetic Shoulder Fracture Periprosthetic Shoulder Fracture

    A periprosthetic shoulder fracture is a fracture that occurs in the bone adjacent to a shoulder prosthesis.

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  • Proximal Humerus Fractures Proximal Humerus Fractures

    Fractures of the proximal humerus are common in elderly individuals suffering from osteoporosis. In younger individuals, a severe trauma such as a fall from a height on an outstretched hand or motor vehicle accident can cause these fractures.

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  • Fracture of the Shoulder Blade (Scapula) Fracture of the Shoulder Blade (Scapula)

    The scapula (shoulder blade) is a flat, triangular bone providing attachment to the muscles of the back, neck, chest, and arm. The scapula has a body, neck, and spine portion.

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  • Shoulder Instability

    Anterior Shoulder Instability Anterior Shoulder Instability

    Anterior shoulder instability, also known as anterior glenohumeral instability, is a condition in which damage to the soft tissues or bone causes the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) to dislocate or sublux from the glenoid fossa, compromising the function of the shoulder.

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  • Posterior Shoulder Instability Posterior Shoulder Instability

    Posterior shoulder instability, also known as posterior glenohumeral instability, is a condition in which the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) dislocates or subluxes posteriorly from the glenoid (socket portion of the shoulder) as a result of significant trauma.

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  • Shoulder Labral Tear with Instability Shoulder Labral Tear with Instability

    Shoulder instability results when the humeral head is not held firmly within the glenoid cavity and may lead to a dislocation. Tearing, stretching or peeling of the labrum can result in shoulder instability. It can also occur with defects of the shoulder capsule and ligaments.

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  • Multidirectional Instability of the Shoulder Shoulder Labral Tear with Instability

    Instability may be described by the direction in which the humerus is subluxated or dislocated from the glenoid. When it occurs in several directions it is referred to as multidirectional instability.

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  • Shoulder Impingement

    Subacromial Impingement Syndrome Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

    SAIS is the inflammation and irritation of your rotator cuff tendons.This occurs when the tendons rub against the outer end of the shoulder blade (the acromion) while passing through the subacromial space during shoulder movement.

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  • Internal Impingement of the Shoulder Internal Impingement of the Shoulder

    Internal shoulder impingement can be described as a pathological condition resulting from repetitive impingement of the internal surface of the rotator cuff by the bones at the back of the glenohumeral joint.

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  • Common Shoulder Conditions

    Shoulder Pain Shoulder Pain

    Pain in the shoulder may suggest an injury, which is more common in athletes participating in sports such as swimming, tennis, pitching, and weightlifting. The injuries are caused due to the over usage or repetitive motion of the arms.

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  • Rotator Cuff Pain Rotator Cuff Pain

    The rotator cuff consists of a group of tendons and muscles that surround and stabilize the shoulder joint. These tendons allow a wide range of movement of the shoulder joint across multiple planes.

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  • Shoulder Trauma Shoulder Trauma

    Shoulder injuries most commonly occur in athletes participating in sports such as swimming, tennis, pitching, and weightlifting. The injuries are caused due to the over usage or repetitive motion of the arms.

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  • Overhead Athlete's Shoulder Overhead Athlete's Shoulder

    An overhead athlete is at increased risk of injury due to the mechanism associated with rapid shoulder elevation, external rotation, and abduction. An overhead throwing motion is an intricate and skillful movement that presents a special challenge of needing the glenohumeral joint to surpass its physiologic limits during overhead sports activities.

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  • Snapping Scapula Snapping Scapula

    Snapping scapula or snapping scapula syndrome is also known as scapulothoracic syndrome or scapulocostal syndrome. It is a condition characterized by painful clicking, snapping, or grinding of the shoulder blade. The sound occurs as a result of rubbing of soft tissues between the thoracic wall and the scapula.

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  • Post-traumatic Stiffness of the Shoulder Post-traumatic Stiffness of the Shoulder

    Post-traumatic stiffness of the shoulder is the inability of the shoulder joint to move freely due to the damage sustained to the normal gliding surfaces of the shoulder as a result of trauma (injury) or surgery.

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  • Shoulder Dislocation  Shoulder Dislocation

    Sports that involve overhead movements and repeated use of the shoulder at your workplace may lead to sliding of the upper arm bone from the glenoid. The dislocation might be a partial dislocation (subluxation) or a complete dislocation causing pain and shoulder joint instability.

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  • Little League Shoulder  Little League Shoulder

    Little league shoulder is an injury to the growth plate of the upper arm bone at the shoulder joint of children. It is an overuse injury caused by repeated pitching or throwing, especially in children between the ages of 10 to 15 years.

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  • Frozen Shoulder  Frozen Shoulder

    Frozen shoulder, also called adhesive capsulitis, is a condition in which you experience pain and stiffness in your shoulder. The symptoms appear slowly, worsen gradually and usually take one to three years to resolve on their own.

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  • Sternoclavicular Joint (SC joint)  Sternoclavicular Joint (SC joint)

    The sternoclavicular joint is the joint between the breastbone (sternum) and the collar bone (clavicle). The SC joint is one of the 4 joints that complete the shoulder and is the only joint that links the arm to the body.

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  • Proximal Biceps Tendinitis  Proximal Biceps Tendinitis

    Proximal biceps tendinitis is the irritation and inflammation of the biceps tendon at the shoulder joint. The biceps muscle is the muscle of the upper arm which is necessary for the movement of the shoulder and elbow. It is made of a ‘short head’ and a ‘long head’ which function together.

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  • Shoulder Bursitis  Shoulder Bursitis

    Shoulder bursitis, also known as subacromial bursitis, is a condition characterized by pain and inflammation in the bursa of the shoulder. The bursa is a fluid-filled sac present between the bone and soft tissue that acts as a cushion and helps to reduce friction during movement.

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  • Rotator Cuff Re-tear  Rotator Cuff Re-tear

    The rotator cuff is a group of tendons and muscles in the shoulder joint providing support and enabling a wide range of shoulder motion. Injury to the rotator cuff may occur due to pressure on the rotator cuff from part of the shoulder blade (scapula).

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  • AC Joint Separation  AC Joint Separation

    AC joint separation, also known as shoulder separation, is a condition characterized by damage to the ligaments that connect the acromion to the collar bone. As a result, the bones do not line up properly, causing joint pain and instability.

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  • Shoulder Tendonitis  Shoulder Tendonitis

    Shoulder tendonitis is a condition characterized by inflammation of the tendons which connect the muscles to the shoulder bones. Tendonitis of the rotator cuff tendons is known as rotator cuff tendonitis.

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  • Sternoclavicular Separation  Sternoclavicular Separation

    The sternoclavicular joint is a joint at the center of your upper chest, connecting your breastbone and collarbone, and held together by a strong band of ligaments. A sternoclavicular separation occurs when the ligaments connecting these two bones together are injured.

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  • Rotator Cuff Calcification  Rotator Cuff Calcification

    Rotator cuff calcification is the abnormal accumulation of calcium deposits in rotator cuff muscles and tendons. The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles and tendons in the shoulder joint that join the head of the humerus to the shoulder.

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  • Shoulder Disorders  Shoulder Disorders

    The shoulder is the most flexible joint in the body that enables a wide range of movements. Aging, trauma or sports activities can cause injuries and disorders that can range from minor sprains or strains to severe shoulder trauma.

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  • Acromioclavicular Joint Sprains  Acromioclavicular Joint Sprains

    The collarbone and the shoulder blade are connected by the acromioclavicular joint. This is supported by a strong band of ligaments called the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments. These ligaments are tightly wound around the bones, providing strength and support to the joint. An injury or tear of these ligaments can result in an acromioclavicular joint sprain.

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  • Rotator Cuff Bursitis  Rotator Cuff Bursitis

    The rotator cuff is a set of muscles and tendons which hold the various bones of the shoulder joint together, providing strength and support. Inflammation of the bursa, a fluid-filled sac between the rotator cuff tendons and a bony process at the top of the shoulder called the acromion, is known as shoulder bursitis or rotator cuff bursitis.

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  • AC Joint Dislocation/Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation  AC Joint Dislocation/Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    AC joint dislocation is the separation of the collar bone or clavicle from the acromion (the top portion of the shoulder blade or scapula at the outer edge of the shoulder) due to severe trauma or injury.

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  • Shoulder Fracture Care  Shoulder Fracture Care

    A break in the bone that makes up the shoulder joint is called a shoulder fracture. The clavicle (collarbone) and end of the humerus (upper arm bone) closest to the shoulder are the bones that usually are fractured.

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  • Triceps Repair  Triceps Repair

    Triceps repair is a surgical procedure that involves the repair of a ruptured (torn) triceps tendon. A tendon is a tough band of fibrous tissue which connects muscle to bone and works together with muscles in moving your arms, fingers, legs, and toes.

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  • Providence
  • Desert Valley Hospital
  • Victor Valley Global Medical Center
  • Barstow Community Hospital
  • Bear Valley Community Hospital
  • California Orthopaedic Association
  • American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons
  • American Shoulder And Elbow Surgeons
  • American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
  • San Bernardino County Medical Society
  • California Medical Association